Subscribe to our newsletter

New call-to-action

HOW PROCESSORS CAN SORT CARROTS WHEN THE REQUIREMENTS KEEP CHANGING

The two main goals of vegetable processing, food safety and product quality, are sacrosanct – but the goalposts keep moving.

Each incoming truck load of carrots might vary in quality. Due to slightly different weather, soil or growing conditions, there might be more or fewer discolorations, or a sudden influx of foreign material. And because carrots are sold in varying quality grades and differing forms, product specifications often also need changing. This complicates the day-to-day business of vegetable processing, but there can be no excuses: no matter how much or how often circumstances change on the processing line, product imperfections must be detected and ejected.  

How processors can sort green beans when the requirements keep changing

The two main goals of vegetable processing, food safety and product quality, are sacrosanct – but the goalposts keep moving.

Every incoming truck load of green beans might vary in quality. Due to slightly different weather, soil or growing conditions, there might be more or fewer discolorations, or a sudden influx of weeds or even insects. And because beans can be sold in varying quality grades and differing forms, product specifications also need changing. This complicates the day-to-day business of processing, but there can be no excuses: no matter how much or how often circumstances change on the processing line, product imperfections must be detected and ejected. 

Making vegetable processors’ lives easier

So much depends on vegetable processors. Not least, product quality to protect retailers’ brand reputations and food safety to safeguard consumers’ health. But processing vegetables is rife with threats invisible to the human eye. Potentially harmful and sub-standard produce has to be identified and rejected from the processing line, yet defect-detection can be extraordinarily difficult.

Quality is vital for Leafy Greens

With the demand for fresh, convenient and healthy food growing among consumers, leafy greens are the order of the day. From fresh cut to pre-washed and pre-packaged products, this is a rapidly growing market with significant potential.

Demand for quality drives innovation for fresh pack carrot producers

In many markets, quality, taste and origin remain three of the biggest influences on consumer behaviour and purchasing decisions. In response to this, retailers continue to revise and upgrade their specifications, pushing fresh pack carrot producers to meet higher standards and food safety regulations than ever before.

How vegetable processors can have it all: Speed, quality, sustainability, safety and profitability

The need for speed at vegetable processing facilities can sometimes seem incompatible with their other operational and commercial objectives. Perishable produce must be sorted and packed quickly to maximize its shelf life, but the faster this is done, the less time there is for large volumes of produce to be sorted accurately for food safety and quality. And as an added complication, retailers and consumers increasingly expect food producers to adopt sustainable working practices.

Ensure Next Season’s Success with the TOMRA 5B

With this year's season well and truly over, it’s time to assess your operational performance by asking the following questions: Did you reap the full benefit of your time, effort and energy? Could you have done anything differently? Is there anything you could look at improving to elevate your process and ensure next season’s success?

Why vegetable producers should prepare for a plant-based revolution

Lewis Hamilton, Simon Cowell, Bill Clinton and half of Hollywood have recently announced their dedication to a plant-based diet. Veganism and vegetarianism are not new. What is new, is how we perceive these lifestyle choices and the sheer number of plant-based foods on offer to us. 

As the appeal of plant-based alternatives to meat and dairy continue to grow, vegetable producers are presented with a new, highly lucrative market receiving heavy investment in preparation for enormous growth. 

Why labor automation is now industry standard for vegetable producers

Only a few years ago, labor automation seemed like a futuristic nice-to-have rather than a serious necessity for food producers. Now, most vegetable producers view automation on some level as essential to the success of their business. 

Consumer trends and tastes come and go. However, there are constants in the food industry that remain the same: maximizing yield, waste reduction, production line reliability, hygiene and safety. 

Using technology to profit in the growing organic vegetable market

Demand for organic food is on the rise. In the US alone in 2017, the market was valued at $45.20billion. By 2025, it is forecast to be worth $70.4billion. This upsurge is fuelled by many aspects, including the trend towards plant-based diets and healthier living. It is also indicative of another trend: that consumers are willing to pay more to know precisely where their veggies come from.