Subscribe to our newsletter

TOMRA Food Nut eBook 2020

Why Resilience is a Must Have for the Frozen Potato Industry during COVID-19

COVID-19 is deeply reshaping our lives, both personally and professionally. Since its beginning, where I live in Bergamo, we have been confronted with something unprecedented, which has marked a line between how we had been living so far and how we will come out after it. Now we are gradually preparing for what will be our new normal and all the necessary changes that this will require. While reflecting on this, I found strong parallelism with the frozen potatoes industry: heavily hit, feeling the blow, but with unshaken willingness to come out of COVID-19 stronger than before. What will be the necessary changes that will help the industry accelerate in its recovery? How can we, as TOMRA, contribute? 

TOMRA Food’s ongoing support shows ‘there is no strength without unity’

Could it be that social distancing brings people and businesses closer together?

How processors can sort leafy greens even when requirements keep changing

The two main goals of vegetable processing, food safety and product quality, are sacrosanct – but the goalposts keep moving. When a different batch of leafy greens comes rolling down the line, processors often have to recalibrate their machines to detect different types of defects and achieve different quality grades. This complicates the day-to-day business of processing, but there can be no excuses: no matter how much or how often circumstances change on the processing line, product imperfections have to be detected and ejected.

HOW PROCESSORS CAN SORT CARROTS WHEN THE REQUIREMENTS KEEP CHANGING

The two main goals of vegetable processing, food safety and product quality, are sacrosanct – but the goalposts keep moving.

Each incoming truck load of carrots might vary in quality. Due to slightly different weather, soil or growing conditions, there might be more or fewer discolorations, or a sudden influx of foreign material. And because carrots are sold in varying quality grades and differing forms, product specifications often also need changing. This complicates the day-to-day business of vegetable processing, but there can be no excuses: no matter how much or how often circumstances change on the processing line, product imperfections must be detected and ejected.  

How processors can sort green beans when the requirements keep changing

The two main goals of vegetable processing, food safety and product quality, are sacrosanct – but the goalposts keep moving.

Every incoming truck load of green beans might vary in quality. Due to slightly different weather, soil or growing conditions, there might be more or fewer discolorations, or a sudden influx of weeds or even insects. And because beans can be sold in varying quality grades and differing forms, product specifications also need changing. This complicates the day-to-day business of processing, but there can be no excuses: no matter how much or how often circumstances change on the processing line, product imperfections must be detected and ejected. 

Making vegetable processors’ lives easier

So much depends on vegetable processors. Not least, product quality to protect retailers’ brand reputations and food safety to safeguard consumers’ health. But processing vegetables is rife with threats invisible to the human eye. Potentially harmful and sub-standard produce has to be identified and rejected from the processing line, yet defect-detection can be extraordinarily difficult.

Customer Testimonial: BS Cocinados, Spain

The new plant in Funes (Navarre), which produces ready-made Spanish Omelettes, is an ambitious project which will significantly increase production capacity at BS Cocinados, S.L. Cutting-edge technology is necessary to achieve the desired quality standards, which is why the company has purchased a second TOMRA 5B unit with the latest chassis developments.

Ensure Next Season’s Success with the TOMRA 5B

With this year's season well and truly over, it’s time to assess your operational performance by asking the following questions: Did you reap the full benefit of your time, effort and energy? Could you have done anything differently? Is there anything you could look at improving to elevate your process and ensure next season’s success?